Utokyo faculty development東京大学

Online Studying

Purpose of the Course

Purpose of the Course

Overview of the Interactive Teaching Program

Lecturer

Kayoko KURITA (Associate Professor, The University of Tokyo), Jun NAKAHARA (Associate Professor, The University of Tokyo)

Guest Lecturer

Hiroaki SATO(Associate Professor, Osaka University), Masanori FUJITA・Shuya WATANABE(Ongakuza Musicala), Takaki ASADA(Teacher, Tokyo Gakugei University Senior), Naoki IRIE(Associate Professor, The University of Tokyo), Nobuyuki UEDA(Professor, Doshisha Women’s College of Liberal Arts), Takehiko KARIYA(Professor, University of Oxford), Hermann GOTTSCHEWSKI(Associate Professor, The University of Tokyo), Yoshifumi SAITO(Professor, The University of Tokyo), Masato SHIBUYA(Professor, Kagawa Nutrition University), Haruo TAKAGI(Professor, HOSEI University), Shuichi HIRAOKA(Professor, The University of Tokyo), Yuki HONDA(Professor, The University of Tokyo), Naomi MIYAKE(Professor, The University of Tokyo), Yuhei YAMAUCHI(Associate Professor, The University of Tokyo) , Akinori YAMABE(Project Assistant Professor, The University of Tokyo), Shunya YOSHIMI(Professor, The University of Tokyo)

Offered Period

8 weeks(+Real-time Session 3 days(18 hours, Tokyo))

The course is offered free of charge at gacco.org, a massive open online course (MOOC) website provided by NTT Docomo Inc. and Docomo gacco Inc.
Registration for the 4th term will begin 2/24/16, with classes starting 4/27/16.

A course video will be distributed once a week during the term. There will be approximately 9 videos (10 minutes each). Attendees will initially download a workbook to complete each week while watching the videos.

Afterwards, 20 students who finish the course and express interest, will be invited to attend a 3-day live session (a lottery may be necessary, with selections made based on students' performance on assignments, etc., if there are a large number of applicants). A faculty member will facilitate the live session to help students engage in work collectively.

Purpose of the Interactive Teaching Course

University faculty are currently in an age of change.

Against a background of shrinking demographics and changing lifestyles, students entering universities are increasingly diverse, while the role that universities are being asked to fulfill in also changing. Universities are being called upon to provide quality not only as research institutions of the future, but also as educational institutions. Demands are being made to show international peers learning outcomes and other measures of student improvement in order to fulfill a responsibility for conveying the education taking place at a university.

Accompanying this trend are demands for results not only from faculty research, but also from the strength of faculty teaching ability. Over and above the conventional approach of simply conducting a class, we now must answer to the quality of classes. Additionally, expectations have also grown for a wide array of creative educational approaches, including remedial education (offering supplementary classes, developing supplementary materials, etc.), class and curriculum development for older, adult students, and class designs that may include ICT tools such as tablets.

インタラクティブ・ティーチングイメージ
インタラクティブ・ティーチングイメージ2

These expectations are manifesting as changes in hiring for university faculty, with increasing requests for applicants to submit a model syllabus or course outline at the pre-interview stage, or to provide a demonstration of how they would teach an actual class. At the same time, no teaching license (such as that required of elementary, middle, and high school teachers) is required for university faculty, which means that no formal training is offered in pedagogy.

Given such circumstance, there are surely more than a few graduate students aspiring to be university teachers yet feeling anxiety and a sense of pressure. The Center offers this course for graduate students in this category—students who wish to not only build their skill as a researcher, but to also acquire the knowledge and capacity needed as a university faculty member who is an educator. The course is built upon the structure of the UTokyo Future Faculty Program, which targets University of Tokyo graduate students aspiring to become university professors. The course places particular emphasis on practical tasks and "studying collaboratively" through an educational approach where students take a leading role in their learning activities. Why not seize the opportunity to think about university teaching in an interactive way with graduate students from across Japan in a wide array of subjects and fields? This is a great chance to step toward becoming a university professor able to foster student learning.

Target participants for this course are not only graduate students.University faculty wondering, "Are my classes sufficient as they are now?" or "Is there room for improvement?" in addition to educators concerned whether their course designs match the culture and atmosphere of their universities, can benefit from this course as a means for supplementing their university's existing FD program. Furthermore, the theories and pedagogical methods of the course are not in any way limited to a university setting. A wide range of people, from elementary, junior high, and high school educators seeking to more skillfully create interactive learning among their particular students, or between the educator and his or her students, to private professionals involved with developing teaching materials, many participants can benefit from the information and techniques provided. Regardless of your background, please consider the course if you have an interest in teaching interactively.

Learning content

Week 1: 4/27~

Knowledge Session

Interactive Lectures: Active Learning
1-1. Introduction: Overview and Structure of the Course
1-2. Background and Definitions of Active Learning
1-3. The Current State of Active Learning in Japan
1-4. Choosing Active Learning Techniques
1-5. Adopting Active Learning Techniques
1-6. Discussions: The Importance of Self-introduction

Skill Session

Hands-on Activities on Teaching Skills:
1-7. Philosophy of Skill Session

Story Session

Interview with Trailblazers:
1-8. Dr. Shuichi Hiraoka “Active Learning in Science Courses”
1-9. Dr. Haruo Takagi “Use of the Case Method in Professional Schools”

Week 2: 5/11~

Knowledge Session

Active Learning Techniques
2-1. Think- Pair- Share
2-2. Jigsaw Method
2-3. Poster Tour
2-4. Peer Instruction
2-5. Discussions: Tricks and Traps of Group Work

Skill Session

2-6. Introduction 1: Forging a Classroom Atmosphere

Story Session

2-7. Dr. Yuki Honda “How to Stimulate an Open Discussion”
2-8. Dr. Nahomi Miyake “Interactive High School Classrooms via Collaborative Learning”

Week 3: 5/18~

Knowledge Session

Science of Learning
3-1. Motivation 1
3-2. Motivation 2
3-3. Accomplishment
3-4. Exercise and Feedbacks
3-5. Discussions: Isolating an Individual Skill

Skill Session

3-6. Introduction 2: How to Improve Our Diction

Story Session

3-7. Dr. Masato Shibuya “Teaching Classes with Breaking a Task into Small Steps”
3-8. Dr. Nobuyuki Ueda “Advancing Project-based Learning to Passion-based Learning”

Week 4: 5/25~

Knowledge Session

Course Design
4-1. Purposes and Models of Course Design 1
4-2. Purposes and Models of Course Design 2
4-3. The Basic Form of a Class
4-4. Utilizing a Class Design Format
4-5. Discussions: Tell Us About Your Ideal Class as a Teacher

Skill Session

4-6. Interaction 1: Breaking the Ice

Story Session

4-7. Dr. Yoshifumi Saito “Utilizing Audiovisual Materials in English as a Foreign Language Classes”
4-8. Dr. Takehiko Kariya “Comparing Teaching and Learning in Japan, the U.S., and the U.K.”

Week 5: 6/1~

Knowledge Session

Syllabus Design
5-1. Creating Learning-centered Syllabi
5-2. Course Description: Learning Objectives and Goals
5-3. Sequence of Course Topics and Assignments
5-4. Visualizing Structure
5-5. Discussions: What Should Students be Able to Do by the End of the Course?

Skill Session

5-5. Interaction 2: Drawing Students’ Reaction

Story Session

5-6. Dr. Hermann Gottschewski “Comparing Higher Education and Students in Japan and Germany”
5-7. Dr. Akinori Yamabe “Creating Classes with Students: A Challenge to Project-based Learning”

Week 6: 6/8~

Knowledge Session

Evaluation to Encourage Learning
6-1. Objectives of Evaluation
6-2. Key Factors Involved in Evaluation
6-3. Rubrics 1
6-4. Rubrics 2
6-5. Discussions: Using Rubrics

Skill Session

6-6. Application: Q & A 1

Story Session

6-7. Dr. Naoki Irie “Working toward Research-Driven ‘Stimulating Education’”
6-8. Mr. Masanori Kato, MBA “Organization Reform and Human Resources Development through Dialogue”

Week 7:6/15~

Knowledge Session

Considering a Career Path of Faculty 1
7-1. Higher Education in Japan
7-2. The Modality of Faculty
7-3. Pursuing the Ideal Way to Teach and Research
7-4. Discussions: A Favorable Balance of Teaching and Research

Skill Session

7-5. Application: Q & A 2

Story Session

7-6. Dr. Yuhei Yamauchi “MOOCs and Flipped Classes: The Future of Universities and Faculty”
7-7. Mr. Takaki Asada, MA “Japanese Classics Classes through Theatricals”

Week 8:6/22~

Knowledge Session

Considering a Career Path by Using Portfolios
8-1. Structured Academic Portfolio
8-2. Confirming the Significance of Preparing a SAP Chart
8-3. Preparing a SAP Chart 1: Teaching
8-4. Preparing a SAP Chart 2: Research
8-5. Preparing a SAP Chart 3: Voluntary Services and Integration

Skill Session

8-6. Conclusion: No Need to Fear Failure

Story Session

8-7. Dr. Syunya Yoshimi, Dr. Jun Nakahara, and Dr. Kayoko Kurita “Considering Faculty in the Future from History”

※Dates base on 4th program. ※Affiliations and position are as of August, 2014.

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