Utokyo faculty development東京大学

Learning How to Teach

What is UTokyo FFP?

An Introduction of the UTokyo Future Faculty Program (FFP)

Objectives

An Introduction of the UTokyo Future Faculty Program (FFP)

At the Center for Research and Development of Higher Education, we offer the UTokyo Future Faculty Program (FFP), targeting graduate students, post-doctoral students, and young educators and aiming to boost the level of teaching ability.
As the scope of high school curricula becomes more universal and as new university students become increasingly diverse, new demands are being placed on university faculty. Traditionally, research ability and results were emphasized for someone aspiring to become a university professor, which in extreme cases, came down to a measure of papers published. At present, however, both teaching ability and a research track record are being emphasized. For example, applicants are increasingly being asked to submit sample syllabi and to demonstrate how they would teach an actual class.
Furthermore, the university classes that a professor might have to teach are changing in terms of size, content, and style. In recent years, there is a shift occurring toward student-centric education and active learning class styles are gaining attention. These classroom approaches are requiring educators to not only be knowledgeable experts, but also facilitators able to spur learning, which means that educators must acquire these skills.

The Center for Research and Development of Higher Education has responded by offering, since 2013, UTokyo FFP in order to boost teaching ability, provide more systematic and effective training opportunities, and target graduate school students aiming to be university professors. FFP is open to all UTokyo graduate students, which facilitates interaction among students from diverse fields. Students coming together from different departments is mutually stimulating and allows valuable human connections to develop as students increase their teaching ability. From AY 2016, the program will grow to include UTokyo post-doctoral students and young faculty members (specially appointed researchers, adjunct professors, and others).

12th UT FFP: Outline

Common Graduate Course Title

Higher Education Development Theory

Schedule

Term A, 2018
Thursday class, 3,4
or Friday class, 3,4

※It is 8 times (irregular every other week). Please refer to the syllabus for the detailed schedule.

Location

Both Thursday class and Friday class Hongo campus · Fukutake Learning Studio

Application Requirements

Graduate students, postdocs, junior faculty and staff

Capacity

25 students in each class (there will be a selection process if the number of applicants exceeds each class size).

Syllabus

Download here<12th Syllabus PDF>

Merits

The merits of attending UTokyo FFP are as follows.

  • It is sure to satisfy your desire for learning.
  • Participants receive an official certificate.
  • Those completing the course can receive academic credit.
  • Participants can build a broad network crossing many fields.
  • Learning opportunities are also offered after completion of the course.
  • Employment information for university professor posts is shared with program participants.
  1. 1.It is sure to satisfy your desire for learning.

    98% of participants who completed FFP to date have evaluated the course as "good" or "extremely good."
    90% have also indicated that they would "recommend" or "strongly recommend" FFP to their friends.

  2. 2.Participants receive an official certificate.

    Participants receive an official transcript

    Those who complete the program following the conditions outlined in the syllabus receive an official FFP transcript signed by the director of the Center for Research and Development of Higher Education.
    In your job application for an academic post, you can include "completion of FFP at UTokyo.”

  3. 3.Those completing the course can receive academic credit.

    FFP offers a common course called University Education Development.
    As an official university course, participants can receive academic credit within the allowances stipulated by each graduate school program.

  4. 4.Participants can build a broad network crossing many fields.

    Participants can build a broad network crossing many fields.

    This allows interaction with graduate students and young educators with different specialties and lets participants reflect on their own education and research.
    Those who have finished the program to date have come from every corner of the University of Tokyo.
    Opportunities to come in contact with graduate students and young educators one might not normally meet inspires participants and gives them a new view of their own education and research.
    This is a chance to build valuable relationships.

  5. 5.Learning opportunities are also offered after completion of the course.

    Prior participants gather to hold their own study seminars together.
    For further details, please see the following.

  6. 6.Employment information for university professor posts is shared with program participants.

    FFP receives requests and recruiting information from university HR departments across Japan.
    To date, four requests have come in calling for applicants who have finished FFP.

Comments from participants

  • - I now pay more attention to whether my explanations in class are clear from the perspective of students and listeners. I've seen that considerable technique is required to effectively convey my knowledge and expertise to others, and I now want to polish my skills for expression and communication.
  • - The program allowed me first-hand experience of the specific preparations, processes, and methods needed for becoming a professor, which has helped crystallize my future goals and plans.
  • - This gave me an opportunity to learn how challenging university education can be. One can become a university professor, without needing a teaching license, by carrying out sufficient research. But to be a good professor, one must learn and master a lot more.
  • - I learned that the facts, particulars, and terminology common in my research field are not widely understood outside the field. When talking about my research, I'm now more careful to explain things in ways people will understand.

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